Holiday Treats!

Willow took me to Stonebridge Imports today and since I am not good at spending money on myself she made sure I got every single thing I wanted as my holiday treat! I’ve never spent so much in my life on crystals…not all at once anyway! 😀 I got Australian opal and labradorite earrings, nice flashy pieces of labradorite, amethyst, agate slices with druzy, a tiny but powerful little moldavite, a gorgeous geometric/fractal fluorite, a peridot bracelet, and moonstone.

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Starseed Rattle

I made myself a necklace with a rawhide rattle and a gorgeous “garden quartz” (it has green inclusions that look like a garden within it!). I’m calling this piece The Starseed.

I can custom-make similar pieces, so if you’re interested please contact me on Etsy! https://www.etsy.com/ca/shop/HonoringWilderness

starseed

Celestial Rattle with Real Meteorite

I’ve added something special to this rattle…an authentic meteorite bead! The bead was quite expensive when I bought it and came with a certificate, but I don’t have that anymore. However the bead has the classic markings on it denoting its otherworldly  status.

See it on my Etsy!

Shamanic Learning

Led by the heart, I come up with ideas that might seem presumptuous — like recently, when I decided to spend time journeying (in spirit) to the North to learn from Inuit elders. I believe that our teachers need not be embodied in human form in this realm, but can speak to us in other ways, and so we can learn without classes. I tend to exhaust available research and book-teachings quickly, so I need to take a leap beyond.

When I journeyed to an Inuit elder, he told me to honour the stone labradorite. I have a beautiful piece, and he told me to make something with it. Then he told me to lie in a sled, all bundled up, and said he would drag me across the ice all night, under the Northern Lights. I did not know if this meant anything in particular, and I didn’t know if the Inuit would even know of labradorite crystals, until I read later of the Inuit story where labradorite comes from the Aurora Borealis. As it turns out, the stone was first discovered by geologists in traditionally Inuit land.

Naturally, I then used my labradorite piece to make a necklace, using the most beautiful red sheepskin I own.

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